Archives


A Sour Note

While there is great anticipation for the coming academic year, there is also one sour note. Over the summer, the Office of the Provost ruled that faculty can be transferred within the institution at any time, for any reason. Essentially, you can be sent to work in Eugene, Portland, Charleston, or any other place the administration can call a university location. You can, of course, also be transferred back or somewhere else. The Provost’s Office believes that you have no right or say in where you work. This is especially frustrating because all the faculty spent countless hours over the…


Welcome new women faculty to campus!

The Center for the Study of Women in Society and the Office of the Provost invite you to a reception to welcome new women faculty to campus. New and current faculty at the University of Oregon are invited to attend to welcome new women faculty to campus, to learn about one another’s research and work, and to inspire collaboration, community, and support across campus. Don’t forget to bring your colleagues with you! While this event is titled as a reception for new women faculty, CSWS welcomes everyone on campus whose scholarship deconstructs and reconstructs approaches to gender, and we invite…


General Membership Meetings

United Academics will be bargaining out next Collective Bargaining Agreement in the 2019 academics year. We will be using the 2018-19 academic year to formulate bargaining planks. General Membership Meetings are a great opportunity to meet with other faculty and talk about what is and is not working at the University of Oregon, and to help inform bargaining conversations. 2018-19 General Membership Meeting Dates Thursday, September 27, 2018, from 5-7 in Gerlinger Lounge Thursday, January 10, 2019 Thursday, April 4, 2019


Update from the BVWU

Community support has been critical to our successive wins these last several months, and without you behind us at every step, Burgerville Workers Union would not have been able to accomplish all that we have. Since we filed for elections with the NLRB and won with overwhelming majorities at 2 locations this spring, we’ve been engaged in negotiations with Burgerville for our first contract. Negotiations have been tough as Burgerville has met even our simplest proposals with resistance, but we’re more determined than ever to continue putting pressure on the company to do right by their workers. While Burgerville promised…


The Janus decision and United Academics

Earlier this morning, the Supreme Court ruled on the Janus v. AFSCME case, deciding that public employee unions cannot collect “fair share” fees from people who have not joined the union as full members. These fees have, historically, been considered both constitutional and necessary to avoid the problem of “free-riding” by people who receive the benefits of the collective bargaining agreement, but do not voluntarily contribute to the costs of bargaining and maintaining the contract. As of today, public employees who have not signed union cards will still be represented by their union, but will not contribute to keeping their union stable…


English Department Formally Asks Provost’s Office to Improve Working Conditions for Career Faculty

On June 11 the English Department presented Provost Jayanth Banavar and Exec. Vice Provost Scott Pratt a comprehensive proposal for improved salary and working conditions for the career faculty in the Composition Program. This presentation arose after English devoted their entire April department meeting to deliver the same requests to the three Deans of the College of Arts & Sciences (Tykeson Dean of Arts and Sciences Andrew Marcus, Divisional Dean of Humanities Karen Ford, and Dean of Faculty Operations Bruce Blonigen). In both meetings, TTF and Career Faculty spoke together to address longstanding problems concerning salary, course load, contracts, and…


Toxic Ivory Towers: The Consequences of Work Stress on Underrepresented Minority Faculty

Ruth Enid Zambrana, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of Women’s Studies, Director of the Consortium on Race, Gender and Ethnicity and Adjunct Professor of Family Medicine at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Medicine. Dr. Zambrana’s scholarship applies a critical intersectional lens to structural inequality and racial, Hispanic ethnicity, and gender inequities in population health and higher education trajectories. Her major areas of research include women and health, Latinos in the US, chronic health conditions in life course trajectories and inequity to access in pathways to higher education.   This talk is cosponsored by the UO Department…


LERC’s Labor Research Colloquium Series

Lecture Series Sponsored by the UO Labor Education & Research Center Spring 2018 February 28th, 2018 • 4 – 5 pm Eileen Otis, Associate Professor, Sociology. Walmart in China: How are Chinese workers confronting the world’s largest company? April 18th, 2018 • 4 – 5 Lola Loustaunau, PhD student, Sociology. Organizing multiethnic, multilingual workers with insecure legal status: challenges and lessons from an intensive campaign in the Portland food industry. May 16th, 2018 • 4 – 5 Bob Bussel, LERC Director and Professor, History. Anti-racist union education in the post-WWII era: learning from history how working people’s art and education…


DuckOUT: LGBTQIA+ Faculty, Staff, and Graduate Student Mixer

Join colleagues for DuckOUT’s UO LGBTQIA+ Faculty, Staff, and Graduate Student Mixer. DuckOUT is a no host mixer that connects LGBTQIA+ individuals across campus and works towards building a more inclusive community.​ DuckOUT: LGBTQIA+ Faculty, Staff, and Graduate Student Mixer Friday, March 30th, 2018 4:45 pm – 6:30 pm Falling Sky Pizzeria, EMU 1395 University St Unit 46 Show the flier at the event for 25% of your entire purchase to be donated to HIV Alliance! Good for all food, beverage, merchandise, and gift certificates. DuckOUT is made possible by the Division of Equity and Inclusion, the Center on Diversity…


On the work of the university: Ken Calhoon reflections on metrics

Dear Friends and Colleagues, Mozart wrote forty-one symphonies, Beethoven only nine. I have written none, but I offer these thoughts on metrics. I apologize in advance for the naiveté, as well as the pathos. On September 14th, at the beginning of the current academic year, University Provost and Senior Vice President Jayanth Banavar hosted a retreat for “academic leaders” in the EMU Ballroom. The highpoint of the assembly, in my view, was Jayanth’s own (seemingly impromptu) description of the research of David Wineland, the Nobel Laureate who recently joined the UO’s Department of Physics as a Knight Professor. In a manner…